What Do Teddy Roosevelt, FDR, JFK, and Jimmy Carter Have in Common Aside from Having Been President?

Don’t be afraid to go in your library and read every book.“–Dwight D. Eisenhower

What do Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, John Kennedy, and Jimmy Carter have in common aside from having served as President of the Unites States?

  1. They were all Republicans.
  2. They were all Democrats.
  3. They are all on Mount Rushmore.
  4. They were all speed-readers.

The answer is 4.  All of these Presidents were speed readers.  Rumor has it that George Washington and Abe Lincoln were also speed-readers–but we really don’t know.   The Roosevelts were self-taught; whereas, Kennedy and Carter took speed reading classes.  Jimmy Carter participated in speed reading classes at the White House with his wife Rosalynn and daughter Amy and read two books a week even with his busy schedule.  Kennedy took speed reading classes with his brother Bobby. Both presidents then brought in speed reading instruction for their staff so that they would be productive readers as well.   JFK could read 2,500 wpm, in part because he was able to read large groups of words at a glance, and regularly read 6 newspapers front to back at breakfast.

The Roosevelts both taught themselves to speed read.  FDR began his speed-reading training by reading two or three words at a time, building to reading two or three lines at a glance, and eventually working up to absorbing entire paragraphs.  Sometimes he would glance at a page, then turn the page and consider what the writer was saying.  Teddy read a book before breakfast every day when he was President and sometimes read as many as three books a day.  His comprehension and recall were fantastic:  He could remember all the important points and even quote from the books he read.

There is a bumper sticker that says Readers Are Leaders.  In the case of these presidents, we could say Speed Readers Lead.  I have met many highly successful people who have told me that they had taken a speed reading course along the way, and we have taught many rising leaders.  I taught a high school sophomore last weekend who doesn’t aspire to the presidency, but he has definite leadership goals and this was a step in meeting them. You might not become a president after taking our course, but you will have the tools and confidence to reach your career and education goals.  To honor the Speed Reading Presidents, all who sign up for any of our spring courses by Wednesday, February 28th can save $50 and take it for the student rate of $425.  Become a speed-reader:  You’ll be in great company!

Bonnie James

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Fake News Precedes Us

Preceding articles from this blog have talked about Fake News.

The following article from the Columbus Dispatch is written by Brad Lepper, the curator of archaeology at the Ohio History Connection.  He says that through the years, scientists have had to devote considerable effort to debunking so-called “alternative facts.  Does this make us feel better about today?

Peter Hancock, a psychologist at the University of Central Florida, has studied several examples of what you might call alternative artifacts, and in his new book, “Hoax Springs Eternal: the psychology of cognitive deception,” he shows why some hoaxes are more successful than others.

Hancock argues that prospective perpetrators of hoaxes must “identify the dream” of their target audience. In other words, they determine what the victims of their scam fervently want to be true so they can give it to them.

Ohio’s most infamous fake artifacts Newark Holy Stonesare the so-called Newark “Holy Stones.”

These are several carved stones engraved with Hebrew writing found at the Newark Earthworks and nearby mounds between 1860 and 1867. Some scholars believed these artifacts proved that ancient Israelites had something to do with building Ohio’s amazing earthworks, but my colleague Jeff Gill and I have shown they are clever forgeries.

Hancock argues that successful hoaxes are never “too perfect.” By “creating something that is suggestive, indicative and open to interpretation, you have made an artifact that many people can use to support their view of the world.”

The creators of the Newark Holy Stones did this so well that it has been hard to identify the primary target of the hoax.

Members of a local Masonic Lodge believed the Holy Stones showed that ancient Masons built the Newark Earthworks. Some Latter-day Saints believed they provided confirmation of the Book of Mormon.

But Jeff and I say the Holy Stones were tailor-made to fulfill the dreams of the Rev. Charles McIlvaine, then the Episcopal bishop of Ohio. In 1839, McIlvaine expressed his belief that someday artifacts would be found in the mounds of Ohio that would prove that “all the races of men have descended from one common stock.”

Why was this so important?

McIlvaine was an ardent support of emancipation. Finding Hebrew artifacts in ancient Ohio mounds would prove that America’s history was part of biblical history. And if biblical history was true, then the indigenous peoples of America — as well as the peoples of sub-Saharan Africa — were children of Adam and Eve and not separate creations of sub-humans.

This would mean that slavery was an intolerable injustice that must be abolished.

The Newark Holy Stones, if authentic, could have made McIlvaine’s dream come true. Instead, these ersatz artifacts offered nothing but false hope.

Hancock offers timely advice for anyone who wants to avoid falling for fake news. He said we must “reserve our greatest doubt for our most cherished beliefs. Where doubt is our companion, hoax will find it difficult to flourish.”

I am participating with Hancock and others in a symposium called “‘Fake News’ from the Past: Archaeological Mysteries and the Psychology of Deception” on May 13 at the Johnson-Humrickhouse Museum in Coshocton, where the Holy Stones are on display. For more information, contact the museum.

blepper@ohiohistory.org

Archaeology: Newark ‘Holy Stones’ are 19th century fake news

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Fake News Confronted by Educators and World Wide Newspapers.

tabloid-news

Tabloid “News”

internet quote picture

Facebook “News”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the picture of the tabloids demonstrates, fake news has been around for a long time and it is still with us at the checkout line at the grocery store! But it is more invasive with  the Internet.

We might be getting sick of the words “fake news” right now due to their overuse and misuse these days. But it is refreshing to know that  good information is out there to help people who choose to take it in to help sort out what is real and fake.

When I was in Bangkok teaching a class for the USAID in January, I enjoyed reading the English version of the local papers.  I found an article about how to spot fake news and to think before sharing (novel approach)!

Then when I got back, our local paper the Columbus Dispatch had a wonderful article about how students are being taught to THINK about what they are reading and how to come up with what is accurate.  Following that, ASCD published an article from the Seattle Times which  released a worksheet to help students lessons on news judgment.

I am sharing the Columbus Dispatch article first.  The next two blogs will be the one from Bangkok and from ASCD (a global community dedicated to excellence in learning, teaching, and leading).  The Dispatch article shows how various area schools are incorporating reading and discussing news articles into social studies, government classes, and writing courses.  I’d love to see a follow-up study to see what kind of conversations might have occurred in the homes where the older generation uses its comfortable sources and the younger one has learned to delve deeper.

Columbus Dispatch:  Teachers confront fake news in classroom lessons

dispatch-article-classroom-picture

Teacher Amanda Suttle’s students know to take with a grain of salt an online article positing that millennials are bad with money and need financial-planning help. It was written by a bank executive. And they get that a photo of mutated daisies, posted online with the claim that they sprouted near Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, could be total bunk. These were examples that she floated this week for her 12-student media-literacy class at Licking Valley High School, just east of Newark, and she’s glad to see their healthy skepticism.

“I often ask them questions that I don’t have the answers to because I want them to think for themselves and not just tell me what they think I want to hear or what they think the ‘right’ answer is,” Suttle said in an email. “I consider it vital that they learn how to question everything, to resist the urge to believe the single story, the stereotype or the first thing they hear. In essence, I want them to read more and not be easily duped.

Continue reading

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What Do Teddy Roosevelt, FDR, JFK, and Jimmy Carter Have in Common Aside from Having Been President?

Don’t be afraid to go in your library and read every book.“–Dwight D. Eisenhower

What do Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, John Kennedy, and Jimmy Carter have in common aside from having served as President of the Unites States?

  1. They were all Republicans.
  2. They were all Democrats.
  3. They are all on Mount Rushmore.
  4. They were all speed-readers.

The answer is 4.  All of these Presidents were speed readers.  Rumor has it that George Washington and Abe Lincoln were also speed-readers–but we really don’t know.   The Roosevelts were self-taught; whereas, Kennedy and Carter took speed reading classes.  Jimmy Carter participated in speed reading classes at the White House with his wife Rosalynn and daughter Amy and read two books a week even with his busy schedule.  Kennedy took speed reading classes with his brother Bobby. Both presidents then brought in speed reading instruction for their staff so that they would be productive readers as well.   JFK could read 2,500 wpm, in part because he was able to read large groups of words at a glance, and regularly read 6 newspapers front to back at breakfast.

The Roosevelts both taught themselves to speed read.  FDR began his speed-reading training by reading two or three words at a time, building to reading two or three lines at a glance, and eventually working up to absorbing entire paragraphs.  Sometimes he would glance at a page, then turn the page and consider what the writer was saying.  Teddy read a book before breakfast every day when he was President and sometimes read as many as three books a day.  His comprehension and recall were fantastic:  He could remember all the important points and even quote from the books he read.

There is a bumper sticker that says Readers Are Leaders.  In the case of these presidents, we could say Speed Readers Lead.  I have met many highly successful people who have told me that they had taken a speed reading course along the way, and we have taught many rising leaders.  I taught a high school sophomore last weekend who doesn’t aspire to the presidency, but he has definite leadership goals and this was a step in meeting them. You might not become a president after taking our course, but you will have the tools and confidence to reach your career and education goals.  To honor the Speed Reading Presidents, all who sign up for any of our spring courses by Wednesday, February 28th can save $50 and take it for the student rate of $425.  Become a speed-reader:  You’ll be in great company!

Bonnie James

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Celebrating Read Across America

Speed Reading Plus Blog!

“The more that you read, the more things you’ll know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.“–Dr. Seuss

Read Across America 1st graders listening to Seuss

I love Read Across America for personal reasons.

I started my career in education as a first grade teacher.

I wanted to be a person who made sure that kids just starting out would like school and like to read. And since co-founding Advanced Reading Concepts in 1977, I love what I do with teens and adults for a similar reason. I help prepare them for additional  learning and to rekindle and have time for a love of reading again. I also help those who never liked to read become readers–so I am sort of starting them off as well.

Once a year I get to go back to my beginnings as a teacher.  I volunteer to read stories to grade school children through…

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The Gestalt: What How to Read the Bible, a Novel and Making Military Decisions Have in Common

Just had a recent graduate ask how to read the Bible and decided to re-post this. Would love to have your feedback.

Speed Reading Plus Blog!

NT WrightI am re-posting this blog as one of my recent graduates wanted to know how to read the Bible.  He was accustomed to reading it one-word-at-a-time.  I told him about this blog and decided to re-post it.  It was written  in 2014 originally, but it is still up to date.

This blog was inspired by a sermon given by Jim Mehler at the Gathering service at Covenant Presbyterian Church last Sunday who showed us a part of a video interview with N. T. Wright, a Bible Scholar from England who has written a number of well-known books.  The video is How to Read the Bible, the Whole Sweep of Scripture.  Mr. Wright’s suggestion was completely different from what I had ever heard before.  Some of the people on Facebook believe that reading the Bible means taking a quote out of context to say “I’m right and you’re wrong.”  Some of…

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“The” Blog About “The”

Since THE game is tomorrow, I decided to re-post “the blog about “the”.

               “The” as a Content WordThe OSU t-shirt

The” is a structure word that is often used as a content word as in it is referring to the only thing or only one that matters.

E.g. as an ordinary structure word:  “I’m going to get “the” groceries.”

red OSU "the" T-shirt

The Ohio State University Alumni Club of San Diego

As a content word:
The” Ohio State University.  Really.  The university is alphabetized under the t’s  in lists of schools!

My own personal use of “the“:
The” Lake (Lake Erie)
The” Bay (Put ‘n Bay)
The” Boat (our boat at Lake Erie)
The” Island (Washington Island)
The” Cabin (our place on “the” Island)
The” Cats (ours of course)!

When students were introducing themselves at the speed reading course I was teaching for Upper Arlington’s summer school  some of them said “I go to “the” High School” as opposed to any other schools that might be represented in the group.

Sometimes the word “the” can be very confusing.  If it’s being used to define “the” only item but instead it could be one of many, it creates poor communication.  As in on “the” Boat when “the” Captain asks me to get “the” Line–there are a lot of lines (ropes) on a sailboat, he is “the” only person who knows what he wants but I am supposed to!

Often  the word “the” requires insider information.  Here in Columbus when people say they are going to “the” Shoe, they are referring  to “The” Ohio State University’s football stadium — not to footwear!   Just like reading, it takes prior knowledge to understand the context.

The word “that” can also be problematic as in getting the request to get “that” thing by the previously mentioned Captain!   There are a lot of things!  English teachers and writers are good at clarifying what “the” and “that” are referencing.  The rest of us think you should just know!

How do you use “the”?  Share with us.

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Bringing Gratitude to Thanksgiving

A wonderful article from Confident Parents Confident Kids.  Hope you enjoy it!  And have a wonderful Thanksgiving.

Bringing Gratitude to Thanksgiving

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Wow!  Our summer results are in and they are amazing.  Please click the link to see them!

white paper with yeah signage

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Source: http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Wow–2018-Summer-Speed-Reading-Results.html?soid=1102415603881&aid=w0sX1bzdXHw

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Helping Kids Deal with the Stress of the Test!

As we strive to give kids less stress on the test with better reading skills, I was impressed with this article on how to handle the emotional part of test anxiety.

confident parents confident kids

”Mom, everything seems to speed up around me, get louder in my head, and I can’t take my test. I feel scared.” This is how my ten-year-old son described his anxiety during test taking time. But though I know he has felt those feelings in the past, this is the first time he’s been able to articulate it.

In fact, anxiety is experienced differently by every person. Some may get headaches, some tummy aches. Some may feel hot, sweaty or like they are going to faint. But whatever the physical symptoms, frequently they can be accompanied by a host of fears. Yes, the stress of performing well is one of those fears but those worries may lead to a number of others like, “Will everyone make fun of me when I fail?” “Will I learn that I actually don’t have the smarts to do it?” and “Why can’t I think?…

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